Home » Phra Luang Ajaan Thate - 37 - Large

Phra Luang Ajaan Thate - 37 - Large

€ 485,00

Phra Luang Ajaan Thate - 37 - Large

€ 485,00

Monnik - Wassen - Beeld

 

Geheel met de hand vervaardigde Thais Boeddhistische monnik. De monnik is geheel in de originele stijl vervaardigd naar beeltenis van de inmiddels overleden monnik. De kleding is in originele kleurstelling en dracht zoals deze in het klooster van deze monnik werd en nog steeds wordt gedragen.

 

Beelden zoals deze worden in Thailand in de eigen woning geplaatst, meestal op een klein altaar of onder een stolp. Als het mogelijk is met het gezicht richting van de voordeur. Deze monniken bieden de bewoners bescherming en kracht.

 

Afmetingen: Hoogte 55 cm, Breedte 48 cm, Diepte 37 cm.


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Thaise Monnik Phra Ajaan Thate 1902 - 1994.

 

Phra Ajaan Thate Desaransi (1902–1994), also known as Ajaan Thate, Luangpu Thet Thetrangsi, Phra Desarangsee, or by his monastic title Phra Rajanirodharangsee, was a famous meditation master and Buddhist monk from northern Thailand. He was a first generation student of the Thai Forest Tradition and a disciple of Ajahn Mun, one of the founding teachers of the lineage. Following the death of Ajahn Mun in 1949, he was considered to be the Ajahn Yai, or the head of the Thai Forest Tradition lineage until his death in 1994.

 

Phra Ajaan Thate Desaransi (1902–1994), also known as Ajaan Thate, Luangpu Thet Thetrangsi, Phra Desarangsee, or by his monastic title Phra Rajanirodharangsee, was a famous meditation master and Buddhist monk from northern Thailand. He was a first generation student of the Thai Forest Tradition and a disciple of Ajahn Mun, one of the founding teachers of the lineage. Following the death of Ajahn Mun in 1949, he was considered to be the Ajahn Yai, or the head of the Thai Forest Tradition lineage until his death in 1994.

 

Thate was a disciple of the very respected Forest Monk teachers Ajahn Sao and Ajahn Mun Bhuridatta. One of his fellow disciples at that time was the Ajahn Chah. Another fellow disciple who remained a lifelong friend was Ajahn Maha Bua. Living and meditating in isolated caves and forests, Thate began to obtain acute insights into the workings of the mind.

 

Thate came to dwell and meditate in the forest near what is now Wat Hin Makpeng in 1964. There, as well as constructing kutirs (or sleeping quarters) and temples for the monks, he assisted with funding local schools, hospitals and sewerage treatment works.

The Ajahn Thate became widely renowned for his humility and the development of his consciousness through Buddhist meditation not just through all sections of society in Thailand but internationally, particularly as a result of international speaking and meditation practise tours to Singapore, Indonesia and Australia. In addition to his large following of disciples in Thailand, Ajaan Thate trained many western disciples in meditation. He wrote a profound short book on the practise of meditation.

On 26 May 1982 The Supreme Patriarch of Buddhism in Thailand (the late Somdet Phra Vaasana Mahaathera) came to officiate at the ceremonial opening of the a Mondop building there and officially declared Wat Hin Mark Peng to be a 'Model Monastery' and gave the Ajahn Thate official recognition of his high status in Buddhism in Thailand.

 

Wat Hin Maak Peng is located at Ban Thai Charoen, Tambon Phra Phutthabat near Nong Khai. Wat Hin Maak Peng borders the Mekong River. The temple compound (sala) is spacious, clean and shady with various species of plants growing around the marble floor and tiled columns. On one side is a mural depicting a multi-headed snake (Nāga) protecting the Buddha while he is in meditation. Nearby are small wooden kutirs occupied by the monks. During the time of Ajahn Thate a gong would sound well before dawn to signal the time when the monks would begin their practise of prolonged concentration of the mind on a single point. Around dawn the monks would file out with their bowls to receive food from the villagers. This was taken back to the temple to be consumed as their only meal of the day. The rest of the day was spent sweeping the paths, studying scriptures or in spiritual discussion with Ajahn Thate. A cup of sugared tea was available at lunch and in the afternoon. Chanting took place in the temple after dark and before sleep meditation was again practised.

 

The cremation of Venerable Ajahn Thate took place on 8 January 1996, a day of bright sunshine. People from all over Thailand — led by HM the King Bhumibol Adulyadej and the royal family — came to pay their final respects. Each region where the Venerable Ajahn had stayed was represented — even from overseas. It is estimated that there were ten thousand monks present and many hundreds of thousands of lay people. The temporary car park was filled with up to thirty thousand vehicles, including many small and large buses from all parts of Thailand. There were free food stalls and refreshments. A half a million memorial books of the Venerable Ajahn Thate's teachings were distributed free to those present.

 

When all was ready, HM the King flew in by helicopter officially to lead the making of offerings and light the cremation fire. The monks followed this, filing past the coffin, then the dignitaries with all the ordinary people who had supported Venerable Ajahn Thate for more than seventy years as a monk.

 

The actual cremation took place later that night with a full moon shining down on the crematorium (with traditional Thai tiered-roofs), lake and fountain, specially built for the occasion. These remain as a landmark and memorial to Venerable Ajahn Thate when devotees come to practice Dhamma and remember his example.

 

The next morning, when the fire was cooled, the bones and ashes of Venerable Ajahn Thate were reverently removed and safeguarded as relics. Inside the temple, there is a statue of Luangpu Thet on display with the eight requisites (the three robes, the bowl, a razor, a needle, the girdle and a water-strainer) and his biography.

 

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